Category Archives: NoRepost

These posts have timely content (anniversaries, birthdays, etc.) that would look odd if re-posted. Hence, this catzegory reminds me not to repost these articles for twitter etc.

150th Anniversary of the Birth of Sakichi Toyoda

Sakichi Toyoda
Sakichi Toyoda

Exactly 150 years ago, on February 14, 1867, Sakichi Toyoda (豊田 佐吉 Toyoda Sakichi)  was born. He is known in Japan as the King of Inventors (which is probably a bit of an exaggeration), father of the Japanese Industrial Revolution, and also the founder of the Toyota industrial empire. Time to take a look back in history on his life. Continue reading 150th Anniversary of the Birth of Sakichi Toyoda

AllAboutLean.com Is Now 3 Years Old!

3rd BirthdayYayyy! AllAboutLean.com is now 3 years old! Three years ago on September 1, 2013, I became a professor and wrote the first post on my blog. Now, 163 blog posts and one book later, I am still enjoying it immensely!

I feel that after three years of weekly (longer) postings, I am now no longer a newbie but a part of the established crowd. Thanks to all my readers for reading 🙂 , and time to look back at the last year! Continue reading AllAboutLean.com Is Now 3 Years Old!

2nd Birthday of AllAboutLean.com

2nd Birthday
Happy 2nd Birthday!

Today, AllAboutLean.com turns two years old! Exactly two years ago, on my first day as a professor, I started blogging about my favorite topic: lean manufacturing and its history. It’s been a great time so far! I have learned tons of new things about lean, have had many good interactions with my readers, and have enjoyed writing this blog immensely. Thank you all for the interest in my writing. I hope it helped you organize whatever processes create value for your company and hence also for you! Time for another look back: Continue reading 2nd Birthday of AllAboutLean.com

Twenty-five Years after Ohno – A Look Back

Taiichi Ohno
Taiichi Ohno, Father of the Toyota Production System

Twenty-five years ago today, on May 28, 1990, Taiichi Ohno passed away. While he was not the only person behind the Toyota Production System, he was its key driver and is considered the father of the Toyota Production System. To commemorate the anniversary, let’s have a look back at his life, and also at how lean changed after he passed away.

To produce only what is needed, when it is needed and in the amount needed. (Taiichi Ohno)

Continue reading Twenty-five Years after Ohno – A Look Back

100th Anniversary of the Death of Frederick Winslow Taylor, the Father of Modern Scientific Management

Frederick Winslow Taylor
Frederick Winslow Taylor

It was exactly 100 years ago today that Frederick Winslow Taylor died. He is considered the father of modern scientific management, the first management consultant, president of the ASME, and the first management guru. He invented and patented the first modern tool steel, designed new golf clubs, and optimized the growing of grass. He could swear like few others, but he also won the US Open tennis championships.

His work was already controversial when he died, but nobody doubts the enormous legacy he has left for industry. Without his achievements, there would be no modern manufacturing. Continue reading 100th Anniversary of the Death of Frederick Winslow Taylor, the Father of Modern Scientific Management

Happy 1st Birthday AllAboutLean.com

Happy 1st Birthday
Happy 1st Birthday

AllAboutLean.com is one year old. Exactly twelve months ago I started this blog on September 1st with my first post, New Professor, New Blog. Since then I have published fifty-six posts. Time to have a look back. What were the most popular posts? How did visits to my blog develop? What is the outlook for the future? And what is there already in the pipeline that will appear soon on AllAboutLean.com? Continue reading Happy 1st Birthday AllAboutLean.com

A Lean Obituary for Maybach – A Cautionary Tale About Cost of Complexity

$439,000 gift with every car purchased
$439,000 gift with every car purchased

With the end of last year, Daimler stopped selling its flagship vehicle, Maybach. I would like to use this opportunity to talk about the danger and harm to your company by increasing the number of product types sold. As an illustrative (and expensive) example, I would like to split the total cost of the Maybach in its individual parts (as far as I can estimate them).  My hope is that this motivates you to reduce, or at least no longer increase, the number of variants in your product portfolio. Continue reading A Lean Obituary for Maybach – A Cautionary Tale About Cost of Complexity